Print this Page   Send this page link to a friend   Add to Favourites   Link to this page   


Art Weiler Rods

Bamboo fly rods are both beautiful and functional. They have great delicacy and smoothness of cast not found in graphite. This difference is noticed especially when a fish is played.
A great sense of "connection" with the fish is felt with every fiber of the cane transmitting the action of the fish to the fisherman.

You may ask "How is this?". The answer lies in the power fibers of the bamboo. When properly constructed, thousands of these fibers are aligned up and down the fly rod.

At ART WEILER RODS all splitting of the bamboo is done strip by strip, in careful alignment with these power fibers so as to maintain them from the tip to butt of the bamboo "stick".
We do not saw the strips or use any device which would split all the strips in one step . Yes this would save us much time, but the resulting strips would have misaligned power fibers.

We also do not initially cut the cane to length, but split 12' long strips, align (stagger) the nodes and then lay out the rod from tip to butt as the fly rod "grew in the cane" to maximize power fiber alignments in the finished fly rod.


Click image to enlarge
Often, when the nodes (joints in the cane) are crooked they are dry-heated to straighten.
We do not do this. We straighten the nodes with steam, the water acting as a lubricant and preventing damage to the node, already the weakest spot in the cane strip. We do not compress nodes as this would cause further damage to the interlocking fibers there. We carefully sand and file the nodes which are then minimized by our hand-planing methods resulting in small compact nodes in the finished rod. We do not mill final tapers into the strip but hand-plane oversized strips down to final taper with careful cutting with hand planes. This results in less damage to the valuable power fibers.

What does this all mean to the fly rod owner? At ART WEILER RODS, we can sum this up in the comment we often hear from people the first time they fish our fly rods - simply put: WOW!!!

We build many sizes and line weights of fly rods and we take great pride in discussing and recommending a bamboo (or graphite) fly rod for your particular needs.

ART WEILER RODS is well-known for our "Garrison Reproduction" fly rods in lengths of 6 to 8' in line weights 2 to 7.

Garrison reproduction models - blonde cane - all have two tips
No 190 6' 2/3 &frac wt
No 193 6(9)' 3/4 wt
No 201 7' 3/4 wt
No 202E 7' 4 wt (2 and 3 pc.)
No 204E 7 (3) 4 wt
No 206L 7' lighter 206 4/5 wt
No 206 7' 4/5 wt (2 and 3 pc.)
No 209 7' 5 wt
No 209E 7(9)' 5/6 wt (2 and 3 pc)
No 212 8' 5wt (2 and 3 pc.)
No 212E 8' 6/7 wt

The Garrison action is "progressive" - that means the rod loads as demand is placed on it.
This action can work in close or far as required. It is an easy loading, precise casting and enjoyable fishing rod.

Additionally, we build Garrison reproduction fly rods in flamed cane and some models in 3 piece (3/2 format) for portability and safety (from theft).

Our "Small Stream" series is specifically designed for fly rod use on creeks, brooks and runs. These rods have been tested for years in this special fishing environment. These rods have stronger tips and faster line speeds.

Two piece/two tips (2/2): Small Stream Special 5 ' one piece 4 wt with sack and tube @ $495 blonde or flamed, slide band seat
6' 3 wt
6' 4 wt
7' 4 wt
7' 5 wt

Three piece/two tips (3/2):
7' 4 wt

For small stream fishing, we would also highly recommend the following reproduction models we make:

Garrison Payne Pezon Young Dickerson

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

202E 96 72 72 7012
201E 98 (R Loire) 63
204E
206 (7)
209 (7)

For delicate midge fishing, our recommendations are for the following:

Garrison Payne Young Small Stream (special taper)


204E 197 (3/2) 7 7 Perfectionist (3/2) 7 both 3 and 4 wt
206L



Art Weiler Rods
RR4 Box 4238
Kunkletown Pennsylvania
610-681-7128

Web Link

http://www.artweilerrods.com



Your Business? Update Now | Correct These Details
Tags:
Print This Page | Email a friend | Bookmark This Page